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Agroforestry Sustainable Food System Model for Small Farmers Developed

Dr. Parashram Patil

Introduction

The Indian agricultural economy is dominated by small and marginal farmers, it’s a challenge
to generate sustainable income for those farmers. It demands innovations at farm gate considering available resource with them. Such one innovation is agroforestry sustainable food system model for small farmers. This model is helpful to small farmers to increase their farm income sustainably.

Materials and Methods

This model has developed at farm and analyzed its outcome both actual and estimated. Dr Parashram Patil is the agricultural economist & founder of The Institute for Natural Resources has been working on this model since last 2 years. The agroforestry sustainable food system model site is located at Gudewadi Village, Chandgad, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India.

The Agroforestry substantiable food system model is agroforestry based. It is inclusive of agricultural crops, trees & animal husbandry. The composition of model is as Cashew 100 trees, Mango 50 tress, Coconut 50 trees, Teakwood 50 trees, Bamboo 200 plants, other fruits
plant 50, Murraya Paniculata 2000 plants (native forest shrub), Rose wood 10, Sweet potato, Ragi, Maize, Groundnut, (intercropping) 0.5-acre each, Buffalo, Goat 2 each. The income from food and fodder has been estimated as well as actual income has been calculated.

Agroforestry Sustainable Food System Model for Small Farmers

This model is based on 1 hectare and it’s a high-density intensive agroforestry with the blend of tress, horticulture, animal husbandry, traditional and non-traditional agricultural crops, forest and shrubs. The income from food and fodder has been estimated as well as actual income has been calculated. This model generates substantial income for the small and marginal farmers in a sustainable manner. It has been given in detail in Table 1.

Table 1-

Sr No. Name of the trees & crops (A) Total no of trees and crops (B) Total value of fodder (C) Total value of food (D) Total Income from food & fodder after 1 year (C+D) Total income from fruit trees after 5 years Total income from commerciall wood after 15 years
1. Coconut 50 20,000 (eastimated after 5 years based on prevaling market rate) 20,000
2. Mango 50 25,000 (eastimated after 5 years based on prevaling market rate) 25,000
3. Teakwood 50 10,00,000 (eastimated after 15 years based on prevaling market rate) 10,00,000
4. Cashew 100 50,000
(eastimated after 5 years based on
prevaling market rate)
50,000
5. Other Fruits 50 10,000
(eastimated after 5 years based on prevaling market rate)
10,000
6. Bamboo 200 Inter cropping grass (Rs5000) 20,000
(eastimated after 5 years based on
prevaling market rate)
5000 20,000
7. Murrya
Paniculata
2000 50,000 (Actual, income current year based on
prevaling market rate)
52,000
8. Rose Wood 10 2,00,000
(eastimated after 15 years based on prevaling
market rate)
2,00,000
9. Sweet potato (intercropping) Half acre 2000 20,000 (Actual income current year based on
prevaling market rate)
22,000
10. Ragi
(intercropping)
Half acre 5000 20,000 (Actual income current year based on
prevaling market rate)
25,000
11. Maize
(Intercropping)
Half acre 10,000 10,000 (Actual
income current year based on
prevaling market rate)
20,000
12. Groundnut
(Intercropping)
Half acre 10,000 (Actual income current year based on
prevaling market rate)
10,000
13. Buffalows milk
(Two)
Based on
prevaling market rate
40,000
14. Goats (Two)
(Meat)
Based on
prevaling market rate
25,000
Total Income after cost 1 hectare 2,04,000 1,15,000 12,00,000
Source (Authors experiment at farm)
Year Carbon Seq (MT Co2e/yr) Area (Hectare) Net Income
1-5 3.6 1 =3.6*5*1*12$*80Rs=17,280/-
5-10 5.3 1 =25,440/-
10-15 5.1 1 =24,480/-
15-20 3.6 1 =17,280/-
Total =84,480 (after costs)
Source (Authors estimation based on experiment at farm)

Agroforestry model for substantiable food system could be effective strategies for generating
sustainable food and fodder and income to small and marginal farmers. This model deficits
small and marginal farmers can generate Rs 2,04,000 from the food and fodder annually.  Second this model shows small and marginal farmers can generate Rs 1,15,000 from fruits trees annually after gustation period of five years.

Third this model revels that the small and marginal farmers can generates Rs 12,00,000 from commercial woods (rose wood & teak wood) after gustation period of 15 years. And fourth famers can generate carbon credit of Rs 17,280 after gustation period of 5 years in this present model. The estimated results of model indicates that present model of agroforestry sustainable food system model is significantly beneficial to small and marginal farmers.

Conclusion

Agroforestry can address complex various challenges of agriculture and environment as it promotes sustainable and multipurpose land use approach. Awareness, policy advocacy, stakeholder collaborations, research and innovations of agroforestry among farming communities is the key to harness the potential of agroforestry and secure a resilient future for food production and ecosystem health.
 

References

  1. Agricultural & Processed Foods Export Development Authority (2022). Anwarul, Hoda., & Ashok, Gulati. (2013). India’s Agricultural Trade Policy and Sustainable Development, International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) Switzerland.
  2. Salgotra, A.K., & Singh, A. J., & Manhas, P.D., (2018). Agricultural growth and productivity in India, International Journal of Applied Social Science, Volume 5 (3&4), March & April (2018) : 192-199
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  9. Ministry of Commerce and Industry, (2018). Agriculture Export Policy, Govt. of India.
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    https://pib.gov.in/Pressreleaseshare.aspx?PRID=1562908
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  14. Navamy, Sudhish (2020), Cashew sector in the throes of another setback, The Hindu.
  15. Patil, P. J. (2019). Small Farms and India’s Agriculture Export Policy, Trade Promotional Council of India. https://www.tpci.in/blogs/small-farms-and-indias-agriculture-export-policy.
  16. Paramsivan, C., & Pasupathi, R. (2017). A study on growth and performance of Indian agro based exports, International Journal of Humanities and Social Science Research, Volume 3; Issue 9; September 2017; Page No. 01-05. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320465482_A_study_on_growth_and_performance_of_Indian_agro_based_exports.
  17. Patil, P.J. (2012). Problems and Prospects of Cashew nut Industry of Kolhapur District, Shivaji University, Kolhapur.
  18. Sandhu, (1982). An Econometric Analysis of Indian Export Share of Cashew Kernel in the world, Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics (India), issue – 3, Volume- 37, Page 300-305  http://agris.fao.org/agris-search/search.do?recordID=IN8203895
  19. Trade Division Report, (2016). D/o Agriculture, Coop & FW, http://agricoop.nic.in/sites/default/files/overviewTrade7082015.pdf
  20. http://www.ictsd.org/sites/default/files/downloads/2013/09/indias-agricultural-trade-policy-and-sustainable-development-goals.pdf

Dr. Parashram Patil is Agriculture Economist, Prime Ministers Museum & Library Fellow (PMML), New Delhi.

Disclaimer: All views expressed in the article belong solely to the author and not necessarily to the organization.

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Acknowledgement: Posted by Aasthaba Jadeja, a Research Intern at IMPRI.

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